Centre for Fine Print Research University of the West of England Centre for Fine Print Research
 

Professor Stephen Hoskins

Past Research

Grant title: A digital archive of the nineteenth century Woodburytype and its working practice

Awarding body:Arts and Humanities Research Council
Awarded to:Professor Stephen Hoskins
Researcher participants: Vikki Hill, Dr Paul Thirkell
Project duration: January 2004

Project details:
This archive contains material relating to the photo-mechanical printing process invented by Walter Woodbury in 1865. Like the collotype process this also takes advantage of the changing nature of bichromated gelatine after exposure to light to produce a continuous tone print. Unlike the collotype process the bichromated gelatine layer does not form the printing plate.

The archive contains journal articles taken from contemporary photographic journals describing this process and its potential amateur and commercial use as well as describing further refinements to the process. Also included are detailed descriptions of how the process was carried out at two contemporary commercial studios as well as a photographically illustrated description of how the process can be adapted for use in the digital age.

To access the archive click the following link http://archives.uwe.ac.uk

Then enter 'woodburytype' as both the Account Name and as the Password.
Account Name: woodburytype
Password: woodburytype

Grant title: Methodologies for the integration of fine art practice and wide format digital printing.

Awarding body:Arts and Humanities Research Council
Awarded to:Professor Stephen Hoskins
Project Manager: Dr Paul Thirkell
Industrial Collaborators: Hewlett Packard
Researcher participants: Carinna Parraman, Paul Laidler
Project duration: 10.03-03.07

Project details:
For the fine artist working within the field of print, wide format digital printing potentially offers exciting new vistas for the production of printed artwork. However, although some common ground exists between the predominantly industry led function of this technology and the working practices of the printmaker, there has been very little transfer of information regarding the question of how some of the quality and individuality traditionally associated with the artists print may also be integrated into this new form of output.

Grant title: What constitutes a reproduction in the 20th Century, through the 19th Century Collotype process

Awarding body: Arts and Humanities Research Board
Awarded to: Professor Stephen Hoskins
Researcher participants: Dr Paul Thirkell
Project duration: 05.01-

Project details:
A component of the now completed AHRC collotype research project (What constitutes a reproduction in the 21st Century) was to assimilate and adapt the high quality continuous tone collotype process for use in a fine art print studio environment. The traditional glass plate method of collotype continues to be used as a part of The CFPR Collotype Atelier. This type of plate making involves pre-coating a grained, 8mm glass plate with a substratum layer (silicate and gelatine solution) before applying a main bi-chromated gelatine coating. The coating is dried for around 8 hours in a special low temperature oven producing a hard, light sensitive coating on the printing plate. The plates are exposed to continuous tone negatives using a UV exposure unit. After exposure, plates are soaked in cold water and left to dry prior to printing.

Grant title: TCS Scheme in association with John Purcell Paper, London. To develop bespoke profiles for wide format printing using artists paper

Awarding body: Teaching Company Scheme (now KTP)
Awarded to: Professor Stephen Hoskins
Researcher participants:Carinna Parraman
Project duration:01.01-01.03

Project details:
A two year project was initiated in December 2001 to investigate and develop paper profiles for artist's fine art printmaking papers. John Purcell is the major paper distributor for artists in the UK and supplies a vast range of artist's and conservation papers.

The rapid development of desktop inkjet printing and subsequent use by artists as an alternative method for printing digital images has highlighted that there is a shortfall in quality inkjet papers. The objective therefore in the TCS scheme is to provide a series of artist's quality papers with colour profiles to ensure images are printed to the best ability of the printer.
Hong Quiang Wang is the TCS Research Associate and is working at John Purcell Paper in London. Carinna Parraman is Academic Supervisor for the CFPR and Jeremy Youngs is the Industrial Supervisor.

A Practical re-appraisal of Continuous Tone Photo-relief printing for ceramics and alternative substrates.

Project Leader: Stephen Hoskins
Funding: AHRB funded, £159,655
Date Awarded:April 2000

TCS Scheme in Association with Cranfield inks Cymbran Wales to develop a methodology for testing new printmaking inks.

Project Leader: Stephen Hoskins
Funding: TCS funding, £76,000
Date Awarded: March 2000

Reappraising the creative potential of underglaze ceramic transfer printing in the light of new technology.

Project Leader: Stephen Hoskins
Funding: AHRB funded, £4,950
Date Awarded June 2000

The artist's book in 'Process' - a critical analysis on the making of an artist's book.

Project Leader: Stephen Hoskins
Funding: AHRB funded, £4,990
Date Awarded: June 1999

Indigenous printmaking - a survey of adaptable technology for printmakers.

Project Leader: Stephen Hoskins
Funding: AHRB funded, £4,987
Date Awarded: June 1999

An investigation into what constitutes a reproduction in the 20th Century, through the 19th Century Collotype process?

Project Leader: Stephen Hoskins
Funding:AHRB funded, £38,203
Date Awarded: February 1999