Centre for Fine Print Research University of the West of England Centre for Fine Print Research
 

Screen Printed Colour As  A Theoretical Model For The Development Of Inkjet Technology


funded by: Arts and Humanities Research board (AHRB)
project coordinator: carinna parraman
project duration: 01.09.2004 - 31.08.2005

The research presents a new perspective from the point of view of the fine artist to provide new insights for the scientific community ie. HP Institute of Physics, Colour Imaging, working within both disciplines to search for new directions for novel research. This is exampled by collaborative research with the University of Milan to present a paper in Russia (2006) “Searching user preferences in printing: a proposal for an automatic solution”

Further conference papers include:

From Dry point to inkjet, Published in Printed on Paper, Northumbria University, Arts and Social Science Academic press, ISBN 978-0-0956

“Experiments in the Hybridisation of Screenprint and Inkjet Colour” presented at IRIS, Nancy France 9-10th November 2005.

“Customising Digital Printing for Fine Art Practice” presented at Electronic Imaging Conference, San Jose, USA January 2005

I primarily Investigate colour spaces, workflow methods, particularly geared for artists, to minimise colour differences. During the artists’ digital print residency at the CFPR - a one week residency for an artist to receive specialist help to generate and print a large format print - using these practical problems, methodologies are being developed for digital printing that attempt to move beyond standard reproductive print methods.

Profiling is used for input and output hardware, along with bespoke profiling for fine art printmaking papers. Furthermore, colour is an important issue: colour fidelity, colour density on paper, colour that can be achieved through multiple-pass printing.


We have found that by working with the artist directly a variety of problems have evolved and were resolved only during the process of the making of the print; for each case, novel solutions and print methodologies are developed as part of the art making process.
   
Research is underway to test colour shortfalls in the current inkjet range, to extend colour through the use of traditional printing inks. The work undertaken at Tate is contributing to these tests. Data and printed samples produced so far have served to highlight potential novel routes of research for the future. This is an area of research that is of particular significance to colour science, and to the commercial sector, is a vast area of enquiry and ongoing, which also requires technical expertise through the writing of software.


Whilst there were no difficulties encountered during the period of the award, this area of investigation, as previously stated, requires further technical support. It has demonstrated there is a potential for new routes for colour inkjet printing. This research is therefore ongoing and is in consultation with a commercial organization, which is protected by a confidentiality agreement.

Scientific models are used, all data is recorded, using a common language, which can be understood by both communities and is useful for both fields.


Work is becoming accepted by the scientific community as exampled through colour tests and consultancy and testing of print equipment for HP.

As a result, I have been invited to present research to Hewlett Packard Laboratories in San Diego with a view to collaborating towards new methods for inkjet printing for artists. I was also invited to present research to the University of Milan “The resurgence of the organic dot”, June, 2005.

The research presents a new perspective from the point of view of the fine artist to provide new insights for the scientific community ie. HP Institute of Physics, Colour Imaging, working within both disciplines to search for new directions for novel research. This is exampled by collaborative research with the University of Milan to present a paper in Russia (2006) “Searching user preferences in printing: a proposal for an automatic solution”

The paper represents a call for the development of an international cross disciplinary network, to work with education, the arts, commerce, science and technology to share both practical and theoretical knowledge, existing models, foster novel ideas, and facilitate dissemination through papers, poster presentations, workshops and publications. The intention is to forge a common language and common methods that are useful for both fields ie developing a research network in Europe (ongoing)